Ontario Butterflyway seeds
Ontario Butterflyway seeds
Ontario Butterflyway seeds
Ontario Butterflyway seeds
Ontario Butterflyway seeds

Ontario Butterflyway seeds

Regular price $35.00
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Invite pollinators into your backyard, patio or windowsill garden with welcoming wildflowers. Proceeds from seed sales support the Butterflyway Project, creating highways of habitat for bees, butterflies and other beneficial species in neighbourhoods throughout Canada.

Species on this page are native to Ontario. We always recommend contacting your local naturalist groups or agencies to confirm what species of wildflowers, shrubs and trees are native to your region.

St. Williams Nursery and Ecology Centre in St. Williams, Ontario supplied our Ontario Butterflyway seeds.

Blue vervain is a fast-growing, long-blooming and deer-resistant perennial that self seeds easily. Spikes of purple-blue flowers appear in mid-summer. Leaves, roots and dried flowers used medicinally by Indigenous Peoples. Attracts butterflies, native bees and other beneficial insects.

Grey-headed coneflower is a drought-, heat- and flood-tolerant member of the aster family. Its daisy-like blooms of droopy yellow petals surround a dense central cone. It’s also known as “prairie,” “yellow” or “drooping” coneflower, “weary Susan” and “Mexican hat.” Attracts bees and butterflies.

Hairy beardtongue is a perennial with hairy stems and long, thin blossoms in shades ranging from pale purples and blues to white. Named for its trumpet-shaped flower openings that look like open mouths with protruding fuzzy tongues. Attracts hummingbirds, native bees and butterflies.

Upland white aster is also known as the “controversial flower,” because taxonomists disagreed about how to classify it. It was considered an aster, then a goldenrod and now is grouped with other former goldenrod species. Definitely attracts bees and is a valuable food source for butterflies.

Check out our planting guide and seed packs for British Columbia and the Prairies.